Humanity, Life Lessons, Poverty, Reality, Simply Living

Dancing so free. Let the sequins fall off of my costume and fall into the world.


By the age of seven I was skilled in the trade of sequin hunting. On hands and knees, back elevated, I had mastered the art of uncovering these sacred slivers of gold, red, silver and pink, in the corners of rooms where the floor board would meet the wall. Unearthing a land mine of sequins that had strayed from their costumes.

Now any good sequin hunter knows that the treasure must be taken care of, either passed onto a friend who will appreciate the shimmer or tucked safely in the side of one’s dance bag, set aside so that one might poke their head in to look at the collection in between tap and jazz class. I am still an avid sequin hunter today; I just look in different places.

I think sequins hold a deeper purpose for all of us. I think sequins can teach us a thing or two about how we should live our lives. As I learn more and more about life every single day I am beginning to see that the meaning to life is not to try to never grow up or leave a place or pass away. The meaning to life is to make it so that no matter where you go, you are always leaving sequins behind.

Let’s get metaphorical for a moment and say that our life is like a costume or a tutu, adorned and bedazzled with brilliant sequins. Well what do we do with this costume? We should certainly show it off to the world, do a turn and spin here and there. But should we be so careful to make sure that the sequins never fall off? That we never lose a part of our radiant garb?

Ah, this is the best secret of all. Let’s dance so wildly, dance so free, shake our hips so furiously that we let sequins fall off, scatter themselves like seeds to plant deep in the hearts of others. At the end of my life I would much rather look down at my costume and see only a few lone sequins or none at all. Of course then I would smile, knowing that I lived my life just right. You see the sequins don’t disappear or disintegrate, they simply find new homes in the souls of others.

This is my hope. To leave glimmering sequins of all shapes and sizes all over the place, to entice people to pick up my words, to inspire people through my compassion, to change people through my actions. And hopefully my sequins will be picked up, passed along, always cherished and always serving a purpose.

A friend of mine sent an email to me yesterday, enclosed in it was a link to a blog of a 22-year-old girl named Molly Hightower. Molly was dedicating June 2009-2010 to Friends of the Orphans in Haiti. She was killed in the earthquake that shook the grounds and soul of Port-Au-Prince on January 12, 2010. I never knew Molly but I have spent all morning reading her blog and seeing the magical works she committed herself to doing. Though she was so young, with so much life ahead of her, I believe that Molly understood life deeper than most. Molly has impacted the lives of so many, in this nation and in nations abroad, and it is evident that her sequins are everywhere; scattered all over, shimmering in the sun and taking refuge in the hearts of many.

You see life, more than any adjective like long, challenging or mysterious, is unpredictable. We cannot guarantee ourselves a tomorrow and so we must work with today. We must continue to let sequins stray from our souls so that others might pick them up and never be the same.

What sequins do you treasure in your own life? What sequins of yours do you hope others will pick up?

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19 thoughts on “Dancing so free. Let the sequins fall off of my costume and fall into the world.

  1. Phew. For a minute I thought you were getting all girly on me there, HK! πŸ˜‰

    But once you shifted into the metaphorical, I started nodding again. It’s all too true there’s more than enough misery and depression in the world, far too many bright sparks like Molly being extinguished WAY before their time. If we can leave but a few of our ‘sequins’ around the place we’re making a positive change. That’s why I think all the work the folks at PostSecret (you’ve blatantly heard of it) are doing is just amazing. I think people underestimate how the smallest gesture can brighten someone’s day – heck I smile when I see a kid give his seat up on the Tube for a granny. We leave the sequins and hope that it’s picked up by someone glass-half-full enough to want to pay it forward.

  2. Be Fri,
    I LOVE this post! Especially this line: “Let’s dance so wildly, dance so free, shake our hips so furiously that we let sequins fall off, scatter themselves like seeds to plant deep in the hearts of others.” You leave sequins all around Assumption and I will leave them all around Prague. Miss you lots.
    Your St End

  3. “At the end of my life I would much rather look down at my costume and see only a few lone sequins or none at all.”

    Beautiful post! You are such a talented writer.

    Best,
    Tegan

  4. Once again, so beautiful. I hope one day you make all these writings into a book as they are so full of inspiration and beauty. “We must continue to let sequins stray from our souls so that others might pick them up and never be the same.” – you’ve summed up my motto and hope for life so eloquently, that may be my new favourite quote πŸ™‚

  5. This is SUCH a beautiful post, one with a wonderful reminder. I try to let my works and what I do in life impact others positively. I don’t do it consciously, though, and this post makes me want to be more intentional about whatever I do. Because, when all is said and done, I want to have made a positive impact.

    Thank you for this reminder!

  6. This is so sweet and on point, and one of the things that I love about blogging is that I hope these spaces become little sequins in other people’s lives no matter where they are.

  7. You had me at β€œLet’s dance so wildly, dance so free, shake our hips so furiously that we let sequins fall off, scatter themselves like seeds to plant deep in the hearts of others.” I am hooked. Lets dance together!

  8. I’m happy to see Molly’s blog and story having so much impact. She was a candidate for next year’s cohort of the program I am in, at CU. Our director sent us an email asking for our prayers, and then the next day sent another email with this blog link, and talking about how she had spoken to Molly’s father on the phone, and he had APOLOGIZED for crying when he called to tell the story of his daughter’s death. It sounds like she comes from an inspiring family all around.

  9. I love it. And I’m so glad I had your blog open to this page for weeks in one of my many saved tabs in firefox, and I’m sorry I didn’t read it sooner, but I love it. πŸ™‚

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